?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Tell me again, why do I need one of these things?

In other news: we finally got a look at Dosk's "assessment". The…

Previous Entry Share Next Entry
frannie yellow
In other news: we finally got a look at Dosk's "assessment".

The fucker left out his medical condition.

Apparently, this is all dyspraxia.

Apparently, the doctor thinks he can lie to his patient.

Apparently, the doctor can break his own obligations.

Apparently, my brother should get a copy of the assessment before he leaves the building.

Apparently, I am a very angry woman

Apparently, my brother is in the room and reading this.

Accurately, I'm going to stop this entry

Accurately, he's crying

Accurately, i feel like shit writing like this

Accurately, i love my brother most in the whole world.
  • I really think there needs to be a new assessment. If the doctor left out the main medical condition, how can it be valid? Surely there's an advocate who can address the situation so he can get his disability.

    {{{Hugs}}} to you both.
    • We're pretty lucky here, you can automatically apply for a "mandatory reconsideration" which is a bit like getting an exam paper remarked*. You can request their documentation to see what they have done and disagree with it. If the "mandatory reconsideration" does not find in your favour, you make a formal appeal.

      The rules over here are interesting. As soon as you submit an application form they start paying you the basic benefit rate. During the whole application process until your medical assessment you get the payment (as the system assumes you qualify until proved otherwise) until a decision is made by the Decision Maker (it's an actual job title). Then the payments cease if you are assessed as not entitled. But as soon as you ask for reconsideration, the process reboots from the start and they start paying you the basic rate until you are proved not to qualify. It is weird (Social Security is weird, every so often the government try to sort it out and add new layers of confusion)

      I think you have an allocated case officer at the local Job Centre. You have weekly appointments where they check you have met your application quota and any mandatory access/skill courses (which is a condition for unemployment benefit). If you are officialy ill, you have to provide a weekly signed fit-certificate (the opposite of a sick certificate - the doctor doesn't assess if you are ill, he assesses what kind of employment/activities you can carry out). If you still are ill, they quiz you on your illness and treatment etc...

      The problem is people who know how to exploit the system. This means that they keep tightening up the requirements on sickness and disability and this gets a lot of genuinely ill/disabled people who are modest, honest and helpful and of the "don't want to cause you any bother..." types get taken off the list.

      Mostly, I think, because it is always an easy policy for winning over the voting public. What everyone does hear about is the few who exploit the system (and often not just for sickness but associated benefits such as social housing and mobility grants) and use money to pay for luxury Carribean honeymoons and take pictures of them doing bungie jumping when they say that they can't walk for more than five metres in excruciating agony and arrive in a cheap wheelchair from argos. This is unlike most people with genuine problems (like my brother) who say that on bad days they can't walk that distance but on good days can stagger down the garden path. This apparently qualifies them as "able" to walk.

      This makes many people very angry.

      p.s. sorry re: venting here


      *I had one at senior high and it turned out I just did rubbish. This was embarrassing.
      • Well I do hope it works out for your brother. At least there he can get the benefits while his case is being considered. In the US, you don't get benefits until the end and even then it can take 6-8 weeks for them to start. It's all very frustrating as you well know.
Powered by LiveJournal.com